are inorganic compounds flammable

Because the C-O bond is stronger than the C-H bond and the H-O bond is stronger than the C-H bond. A link to the app was sent to your phone. No packages or subscriptions, pay only for the time you need. Sodium metal may react with a lot of things, but once it's been oxidized by chlorine to make sodium chloride, it's not going anywhere. So it won't evaporate enough to let new unreacted material get exposed to the oxidizer. They're just not very useful as day-to-day fuel, most of the time. can be oxidized. Most questions answered within 4 hours. Mo (s) + O2 (g) → MoO2 (s) : ΔHform = -587 kJ/mol, Mo (s)+ 3/2 O2 (g) → MoO3 (s) : ΔHform = -745 kJ/mol. MoO2 (s) + 1/2 O2 (g) = MoO3 (s) : ΔHrxn = (Hproducts - Hreactants) = -745 - (-587) kJ/mol = -158 kJ/mol. You can think of it like it's already been "burnt up". There are different levels of oxidation for elements, so consider the products that can be possibly formed, i.e., can this element be further oxidized? Magnesium metal, for instance, will burn very bright and hot if you can manage to light it! Most inorganic compounds contain ionic bonds - atoms tightly held together in contrast to organic (carbon) compounds. Many inorganic compounds can undergo combustion, i.e. All a combustion reaction is, is a reaction between a fuel (like gasoline) and an oxidizer (like oxygen in air) that generates heat. (video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wbfjyp9ZyhM). All a combustion reaction is, is a reaction between a fuel (like gasoline) and an oxidizer (like oxygen in air) that generates heat. Matthew V. This allows organic compounds to react with oxygen. Get a free answer to a quick problem. They're just not very useful as day-to-day fuel, most of the time. answered • 03/19/19, Math and science tutor specializing in chemistry and physics, Some inorganic compounds are combustible, believe it or not! * When you break relatively weak bonds to make relatively strong bonds then energy is released. A lot of inorganic compounds, like you said, are not combustible, and that is for one of two reasons: 1: They are already oxidized. A lot of ceramics (like glass) are made of metal oxides, which is to say metals that have already reacted with an oxidizer (like oxygen, chlorine, etc.). Answer (1 of 3): Organic compounds are more flammable. Combustion produces water and carbon dioxide. 2: The inorganic compound isn't volatile. Bu if you make it a fine powder (so the many small particles makes it behave more like a gas) you get a much more exciting reaction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhG2e6mpdEY, Stephen S. Some inorganic compounds are combustible, believe it or not! A good example of this is aluminum. Take a torch to a block of aluminum, and not much happens (it might melt, bit not enough evaporates to make a reaction visible). Start here or give us a call: (312) 646-6365, © 2005 - 2020 Wyzant, Inc. - All Rights Reserved, a Question Choose an expert and meet online. answered • 04/05/19, PhD in Physical Chemistry + BS in Chemistry w/ minor in Mathematics. For Free, SN1SN2 - Nucleophilic Substitution Reactions. Lucio F. Salts, inorganic compounds, do not react with oxygen, hence they are non-combustable. answered • 03/14/19, Experienced High School Tutor specializing in Chemistry. Oftentimes the surface will get a layer of oxidized material (and more like case 1), which keeps the rest of the material from making contact with the oxidizer. They react more readily with oxygen in a reaction known as combustion. This is an exothermic reaction (gives off heat) involving an inorganic oxide.

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